Commissions

Something you didn't know you needed until now.

If you have an animal you adore, and perhaps a bit of a silly side, then this kind of portrait might be just the thing for you!

A commissioned portrait is a fun way to indulge your love for a pet and add a bit of formal whimsy to your decor.

Give one as a fabulous, completely-unexpected gift to someone who adores their pet, or to someone who lost their beloved companion animal.

Here's how the process works

1. I'll need good photographs

Photos should be taken from the eye level of the animal, not looking down on them from above. A good sign that you’ve got the right angle is when you can see their chin. The very best photos are taken when the animal is seated; they’re more upright that way, just as a person would be in a portrait.

A head-on view, or slightly turned view of the animal work great. Imagine you’re taking a school photo! Don’t get so close to the animal that the nose looks larger in the photo than it actually is.

High resolution images taken in good light will help me see all the details. If you can, take photos outside on a cloudy day, or in a room with lots of natural light.

If the animal has passed away, I will use whatever photos you have and still make a lovely portrait …. maybe with a little more guidance from you.

A few pointers on photography

GOOD!! Nice face-forward photo of Mattie. Cute little chin!

NOT!! Mattie's too close to the camera so her nose looks too big.

GOOD!! Dante is posing like a movie star! Nice, natural light, too.

NOT!! We're seeing too much of the top of Oakley's face here.

GOOD!! Pepe´on the counter for his fab eye-level side-view photo.

NOT!! The camera flashed, and the photographer was standing above Foxy.

GOOD!! Good, eye-level photo of Guinea Pig Basil wins the prize!

GOOD!! Mugsy in good light... so we could see his features.

2. Choosing historical reference

Next, we’ll work together to select an historical portrait that works just right with your pet and your classic style. It’s time to get those creative juices going!

You can start thinking about your portrait by exploring the ideas below.

  • Think of an era or style of art and clothing you're drawn to... like Elizabethan, Early American, or Renaissance
  • Consider portrait artists from the past that you like... for example John Singer Sargent, Anthony Van Dyck, or Rembrandt
  • Tell me particular works of art you favor... like one of Hans Holbein’s Henry VIII portraits, Girl with a Pearl Earring, or Mona Lisa
  • Consider your animal's body type... If round (like a Guinea Pig or a Bulldog) it can work better to start with a portrait of a heavier person. If tiny, we'd want to explore portraits of children.

Once I know a general or specific idea of what you’re looking for, I can send you links to more historical portraits to choose from. You’ll guide the concept of the portrait, and I will add my input so the end result is fabulous. After many years, I’m a bit of an expert at painting elegantly dressed critters; it’s my main bragging right in life, and I’ll be using it to create a masterpiece for you!

NOTE: Okay, you might be super excited about this creative process, and think it’s the best part. If you’re not, don’t worry! Just take a look at THIS SECTION of my shop where you can view the largest collection of my portraits available to see. Find a few you like and let me know what they are. I’ll send you other historical portraits that are kind of like those, and I’ll give you my recommendations on which one I think will look the very best.

3. Creating a sketch

Next, it’s time for me to create a pencil sketch.

The sketch phase is a time when adjustments can be made without much difficulty… though we will be sticking to the photo and historical painting already selected. And now it’s time to confirm colors.

4. Painting the portrait

Once the sketch is approved, I’ll start the painting. When the painting is complete, I’ll send another image to make sure that I’ve captured your pet’s likeness accurately.

At this point, small adjustments can still be made if any fine-tuning is necessary.

After approval, the painting will need to dry for two weeks. Then I’ll put several coats of varnish on it. When that dries, it’ll be ready to send to you.

You’ll get the tracking number from me once the painting is on the way.

And there you have it... the royal treatment for

Here's where to find out about sizes and prices... and how to order